This week in climate news - 22 July 2018

The most popular articles from the past week.

Expected sea-level rise following Antarctic ice shelves' collapse

Scientists have shown how much sea level would rise if Larsen C and George VI, Antarctic ice shelves at risk of collapse, were to break up. While Larsen C has received much attention due to the break-away of a trillion-ton iceberg from it last summer, its collapse would contribute only a few millimeters to sea-level rise. »
19 July 2018, 16:31 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

That Self-Styled "Very Stable Genius" Is a Danger to Stability

Pres. Trump threatens the equilibrium not just of the international order, but of the planet we all depend on -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - scientificamerican - Search similar - Email

Scientists lack vital knowledge on rapid Arctic climate change

Arctic climate change research relies on field measurements and samples that are too scarce, and patchy at best, according to a comprehensive review study. The researchers looked at thousands of scientific studies, and found that around 30% of cited studies were clustered around only two research stations in the vast Arctic region. »
18 July 2018, 22:00 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education

A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues. These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change

A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change. »
16 July 2018, 20:40 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

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