This week in climate news - 12 August 2018

The most popular articles from the past week.

Domino-effect of climate events could push Earth into a ‘hothouse’ state

Leading scientists warn that passing such a point would make efforts to reduce emissions increasingly futile. A domino-like cascade of melting ice, warming seas, shifting currents and dying forests could tilt the Earth into a “hothouse” state beyond which human efforts to reduce emissions will be increasingly futile, a group of leading climate scientists has warned. »
6 August 2018, 23:10 - guardian - Search similar - Email

Wetter soil is leading to reduced methane gas absorption

A new paper finds that the existing effects of global warming are decreasing the soil's ability to absorb methane gas. The paper details findings from a study that measured forest-soil uptake of methane gas in a variety of locations and settings over a 13- to 27-year span and detected decreases of 53 to 89 percent. »
7 August 2018, 04:30 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

With the world on fire, we must act now to tackle climate change | Letters

Kim and Nick Hoare fear for their son’s future after his farm was destroyed by wildfires, and Prof Tom Spencer calls for a much deeper debate about how to deal with rising sea levels On Monday we received the distressing news that the agro-forestry farm where our son and his partner live in Portugal has been destroyed by wildfires. Thankfully no lives were lost. »
8 August 2018, 19:30 - guardian - Search similar - Email

Reflecting sun's rays would cause crops to fail, scientists warn

Research shows geoengineering method intended to combat climate change would have adverse effect on agriculture. Proposals to combat climate change by reflecting the sun’s rays back into space would cause widespread crop failure, cancelling out any benefits to farming from the reduction in warming, according to new research. »
8 August 2018, 19:30 - guardian - Search similar - Email

Mojave Desert birds crashed over the last century due to climate change

More than 100 years ago, biologists conducted a thorough survey of birds in the Mojave Desert. A recent resurvey shows that the species richness of the desert habitat has dropped by 43 percent over the past century, on average, at the sites revisited. »
7 August 2018, 23:00 - sciencedaily - Search similar - Email

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